Is it really accessibility or just another money racket?

Introduction

I've been a wheelchair user my whole life. I never asked to be disabled, it's just what happened. This comes with me needing things accessible and I'm not just talking about a ramp in every building or automatic doors - this goes so much deeper. My wheelchair alone has to be fitted to suit my individual needs.

If you were to ask everyone who uses a wheelchair if their wheelchair is unique to them, they’d tell you it is. With this in mind, we've been looking at ways to make Control 1 accessible to all. This includes looking into several different types of joystick toppers as these play a vital role into how people use the controller. When researching I was horrified to discover how much people want for a joystick topper! A standard golf ball topper that I use can cost between £10 - £80, and for a more secure stable joystick it can be between £60 - £1000! This might not seem like a lot of money to some of you, but it can be a lot to others. Why should disabled people have to pay so much money just to drive their chairs in whatever way works for them?  So it raises the question: has accessibility become a money racket instead?

What can be done

In an ideal world, what needs to happen is Joysticks should be sold at a fair price no matter what the shape or size. If you were to collect every spare golf ball that golfers use and reuse them, you would find that we would all be saving a lot of money. Research from Google  shows that. 

As it turns out, many golf balls are recycled, but there are still an estimated 300 million golf balls that are lost or discarded in the United States every year. Sadly we can’t do much about the lost golf balls, but if we were to save the ones that get thrown away, it would result in a lot of money saved. We should come together and come up with ways to make things cheaper. Personally, I would go to the source of the people who make the products to figure out why they charge so much - because they definitely don’t cost this much to make! It's about time the world stops making life more difficult

Examples of ways you can help accessibility 

  1. Someone used recycled tires to make raps more accessible. 
  2. You can donate and recycle used disability equipment

Information found at the following sites 

Joystick information: https://www.etsy.com/ie/listing/826179962/wheelchair-joystick-handle-replacement

https://www.besonlineshop.net/product-page/bodypoint-joystick-handles-for-powered-wheelchairs

https://www.merushop.org/product/wheelchair-control-knobs/

 Recycled tires link: https://ecogreenequipment.com/recycled-tires-make-life-more-accessible-for-wheelchair-bound/

Donate and recycle used disability equipment: https://www.scope.org.uk/advice-and-support/second-hand-disability-equipment/
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